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Limo Service in Philadelphia can take you many places!

Philadelphia Limo Service can take you back in time!

 

One of the best uses for the Philadelphia Limo Service is their willingness to take you where ever you want to go and help you with your schedule.

The Elfreth’s Alley Museum is the ideal destination to further enrich your next visit to the city of Philadelphia. Located in the heart of Old City between Front and 2nd Streets just north of Arch, the Elfreth’s Alley Museum is one of few landmarks dedicated to the everyday American.

There are thirty-two buildings along Elfreth’s Alley which were built between the 1720s and 1830s, and today they tell the fascinating stories of everyday life, the spaces that America’s founders knew. You can learn the house-by-house story of the Alley’s early residents through our guidebook, available online and in the Museum Shop.

The Elfreth’s Alley Museum tells several unique stories about early Philadelphia. The Museum is located in 124 and 126 Elfreth’s Alley. Guided tours begin in the Museum Shop (number 124), and tell the amazing story of two dressmakers whose sewing business in house 126 reveals the lives of early American women, workers, and the transformations that came with the age of factories and industry.

Only houses 124 and 126 are open to the public. Elfreth’s Alley hopes to add House 128 to the museum complex as an exhibition space dedicated to the city’s 19th Century industrial culture with a media/education center to further enhance our programming. The other houses remain private homes where Philadelphia families have lived in the same spaces for 300 years. Alley residents open some of these homes every year, as part of the Fete Day and Deck the Alley celebrations. Below are several ways in which one may enrich their visit to Philadelphia’s historic sites.

Elfreth’s Alley — popularly known as “Our nation’s oldest residential street” – dates back to the first days of the eighteenth century. Twenty years after William Penn founded Pennsylvania and established Philadelphia as its capital, the town had grown into a thriving, prosperous mercantile center on the banks of the Delaware River.

Philadelphians had abandoned Penn’s plan for a “greene countrie towne” and instead created a cityscape similar to what they remembered in England. Wharves stretched out into the river, welcoming ships from around the world. Shops, taverns, and homes crowded the area along the river. Philadelphians made and sold items essential to life in the New World and to the trade that was a part of their daily lives.

Two of these colonial craftsmen, blacksmiths John Gilbert and Arthur Wells, owned the land where Elfreth’s Alley now sits. In 1702, each man gave up a portion of his land to create an alleyway along their property line that connected their smithies near the river with Second Street, one block away. By that date, Second was a major north-south road, connecting Philadelphia with towns north and west of the city and the frontier beyond. Limo Service of Philadelphia can drop you off at the museum and gives you many chances to explore this historial area.

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, numerous artisans and craftsmen resided on Elfreth’s Alley, often living and working in the same building. Even at that early date, Elfreth’s Alley had a diverse population. English colonists who worshiped at nearby Chris Church lived next door to Moses Mordecai, a Jewish merchant who was a leader of Mikveh Israel Synagogue. Cophie Douglass, a former slave, began his life as a free man in post-revolutionary Philadelphia while living on Elfreth’s Alley. During the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century, the Alley became a neighborhood of immigrants from Germany, Ireland, and other parts of Europe who sought new opportunities in America.

By the early twentieth century, the Alley had become a run-down, impoverished area and faced numerous demolition threats. In 1934, Alley resident Dorothy Ottey organized a group of men and women to save several colonial houses from demolition by absentee landlords. They called themselves the Elfreth’s Alley Association and helped to rescue the street from additional threats, including construction of I-95 in the late 1950s.

Since 1702, Elfreth’s Alley has been home to more than 3,000 people. Today thirty-two houses, built between 1728 and 1836, line the alley. They form one of the last intact early American streetscapes in the nation.  Elfreth’s Alley is a National Historic Landmark District, one of the first districts that celebrates the lives of everyday Americans.

Hours
April – December:
Tuesdays – Saturdays: 10-5
Sundays: 12-5
*The last tour of each day leaves 40 minutes prior to closing.

Call Philadelphia Limo Service and let them know your plans. Tell them what kind of budget you have, how many would be going and they will work with you to make this adventure happen!

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Limo Service in Philadelphia can take you many places!

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Our first experience with your company and it was excellent. The driver was on time, courteous and knowledgeable. The car was clean, comfortable and quiet. We would certainly use your service again and will recommend.

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My company had an international artist picked up at JFK and dropped off in Philadelphia, and the artist had the best time. The driver kept in touch with me throughout the day, so we could plan for arrival, and our artist had the most wonderful experience with the driver. That’s really astounding considering our artist had just gotten off a red-eye from across the world. Thank you so very much!

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